17
Oct
13

Snooty English Majors

I am in the process of revising a short story I wrote for my creative writing workshop.  It’s called “The Revert” and should be out in early 2014 iA!

The way our workshop goes is that we pass out the story to each of our classmates the class meeting before, and then the next class we spend half of the period talking about the person’s story.  We discuss things like what we liked, what we didn’t like, what worked, what didn’t work, what was confusing, and etc.  We are also expected to write a 2-3 page letter to the author/our peer and tell him or her our concerns and feedback about the story.

I would just like for anyone to who hasn’t been through this to imagine spending hours upon hours writing a story, and then having it be torn apart in your presence while you sit there silently taking down notes.  It’s pretty intense, and there is a level of maturity and distance that the author needs to have, met with respect, sincerity, and gentleness by the peers who are discussing the work.

I was reading through the letter responses I got and I came across one that made my jaw drop.  I might have been upset by the tone of my classmate who wrote a critique of my short story, but it was just too hilarious for me to care.

“A few enticing hints of the character’s past are dropped sporadically in between info dumps but ultimately they are all just pebbles drowning in the ocean under the stormy waves of exposition.”

“But quite frankly, the character [in the story] doesn’t care for that stuff and neither do I.”

“…but what little that is there [in the story for me to get] just keeps getting buried over and over again by the avalanches of exposition sent down over the rest of the story.”

The last excerpt could use a little bit of editing, huh? “Avalanches sent down” sounds too awkward, I like “avalanches crashing down over the rest of the story” better, don’t you?

لا حول و لا قوة إلا بالله!!!!!

I guess this is just a not-so-friendly reminder that how you say something makes a bigger difference than what it is you actually say.

Also–I only meet this kind of self-absorbed trope of a classmate in my classes that are listed with the English Department.  These kinds of people are never in my Comparative Literature classes, aH, we are the cool kid club and that is one of the many reasons I chose Comp Lit 😀

P.S.–I can’t wait to share the story with you guys, it’s honestly the most I’ve pushed myself as a fiction writer and I am definitely pushing the envelope with this one.

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